Category Archives: Music YoU PLAY

Journey Ahead in 2016

Year End Report and Journey Ahead for 2016

By | Music YoU HEAL, Music YoU JAM, Music YoU PLAY, Music YoU SING, News, Program Updates | No Comments

Work at the Snohomish County Music Project focuses on clients of all ages from all parts of the county. From seniors in Snohomish, to youth in South Everett, to children in Quil Ceda, the Music Project serves a diverse group of people. Each population has unique challenges. Since these groups vary so widely in age and location, our community partners don’t interact with each other often. Our partners are part of the community and deeply embedded. It makes for stronger relationships and sustainable support. Since these partners rarely interact with one another,  the chance to hear how programming is positively influencing each population is rare. For this reason, the Music Project will release a year-end report in January.
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Youth programs flourish in 2015, such as the Casino Road Keyboard Orchestra

Youth programs flourish in 2015

By | Music YoU JAM, Music YoU PLAY, News, Program Updates | No Comments

Youth programs flourished in 2015. The Snohomish County Music Project works with local community partners, to help identify, support, and nurture children in the community. Some of these partners are the Tulalip Tribes Charitable Fund and the Community Foundation of Snohomish County. Thanks to support from the community and individuals like you, programs have flourished. One example is the Casino Road Keyboard Orchestra, which doubled in size. However, that’s just one of many here at the Music Project.  Programs include:
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Casino Road Keyboard Orchestra warms up

Casino Road Winter Recital a huge success

By | Music YoU PLAY, News, Program Updates | No Comments

The Casino Road Keyboard Orchestra celebrated the end of their current quarter with a winter recital on Saturday, December 5, 2015.

The Casino Road Keyboard Orchestra program began in February 2014. It had just 15 children. Today, there are over 90 each week. The program has also expanded to include parents so that entire families can share the experience. At no cost to participants, this program is a thriving part of the Casino Road neighborhood.
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Music Project work with Tulalip Tribes featured in Everett Herald

By | In the Press, Music YoU PLAY, News, Program Updates | No Comments

The Snohomish County Music Project’s work with the Tulalip Tribes was featured in the Everett Herald on Wednesday, October 21.

What appeared to be a simple singalong was actually a program in music therapy, run by the Snohomish County Music Project, a local nonprofit, and paid for by the Tulalip Tribes.

It’s also one of several initiatives the tribes have undertaken in the past year to enhance the mental well-being of its members.

It all falls under the category of “trauma-informed care,” a theory and practice that allows communities that have been exposed to extreme trauma to find a way to recover and heal, and which often extends beyond the initial triggering incident.

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Casino Road Keyboard Orchestra youth celebrate with recital

By | Music YoU PLAY, News, Program Updates | One Comment

The Casino Road Keyboard Orchestra, comprised of youth from Everett’s Casino Road neighborhood, performed at their recital Saturday, August 29th. Over one hundred youth, family, and friends attended.

During the recital, youth sang original songs, played piano, and beat drums. Afterward, friends and family viewed each youth’s artwork and enjoyed refreshments. Artwork included their own homemade shakers, decorated CDs, and “stained glass” windows.

The Casino Road Keyboard Orchestra was created by the Snohomish County Music Project (SCMP) to encourage pro-social behavior development and build self-esteem. Led by Karla Hawley, Music Therapy Director at the SCMP, this programs utilizes three music therapists with clinical training as well as one music educator at the South Everett Boys and Girls Club. Students learn to play piano, record their music, and sing.

Each child completes a questionnaire about their emotional health and interest in the program. Parents are polled anonymously but less frequently. This data is then use to both improve the program as well as to identify challenges these youth might be facing.